Pressure flow and resistance relationship help

Blood pressure, blood flow, and resistance - Osmosis

pressure flow and resistance relationship help

Open Access Journals that operates with the help of 50,+ Editorial Board Heart; Cardiac cycle; Arteries; Blood flow; Vasodilation; Arterial Resistance; .. ( ) Relationship between Fibroblast Growth Factor 21 and Extent of Left stress attenuates the increase in arterial blood pressure during the cold pressor test. Relationship between blood flow, vascular resistance and blood pressure. Kirk Levins. Blood Flow 1. Blood flow is defined as the quantity blood passing a given . It also discusses resistance which is due to factors that impede or slow blood flow . elastic fibers in the arteries help maintain a high-pressure gradient as they . The relationship between blood volume, blood pressure, and blood flow is.

So I should just write that. Pressure in millimeters of mercury. That's the units that we're talking about.

pressure flow and resistance relationship help

So the pressure falls dramatically, right? So from 95 all the way to five, and the heart is a pump, so it's going to instill a lot of pressure in that blood again and pump it around and around.

And that's what keeps the blood flowing in one direction. So now let me ask you a question. Let's see if we can figure this out. Let's see if we can figure out what the resistance is in all of the vessels in our body combined.

So we talked about resistance before, but now I want to pose this question. See if we can figure it out. So what is total body resistance? And that's really the key question I want to try to figure out with you. We know that there is some relationship between radius and resistance, and we talked about vessels and tubes and things like that.

But let's really figure this out and make this a little bit more intuitive for us.

Pressure, Volume, Flow and Resistance

So to do that, let's start with an equation. And this equation is really going to walk us through this puzzle. So we've got pressure, P, equals Q times R. Really easy to remember, because the letters follow each other in the alphabet. And here actually, instead of P, let me put delta P, which is really change in pressure. So this is change in pressure. And a little doodle that I always keep in my mind to remember what the heck that means is if you have a little tube, the pressure at the beginning-- let me say start; S is for start-- and the pressure at the end can be subtracted from one another.

The change in pressure is really the change from one part of tube the end of the tube. And that's the first part of the equation. So next we've got Q. So what is Q? This is flow, and more specifically it's blood flow. And this can be thought of in terms of a volume of blood over time.

So let's say minutes. So how much volume-- how many liters of blood are flowing in a minute?

Chapter 15 Blood Flow and Pressure

Or whatever number of minutes you decide? And that's kind of a hard thing to figure out actually.

Pressure and Blood Flow

But what we can figure out is that Q, the flow, will equal the stroke volume, and I'll tell you what this is just after I write it.

The stroke volume times the heart rate. So what that means is that basically, if you can know how much blood is in each heartbeat-- so if you know the volume per heartbeat-- and if you know how many beats there are per minute, then you can actually figure out the volume per minute, right? Because the beats would just cancel each other out. And it just turns out, it happens to be, that I'm about 70 kilos. And for a 70 kilogram person, the stroke volume is about 70 milliliters.

So for a 70 kilo person, you can expect about 70 milliliters per beat.

pressure flow and resistance relationship help

And as I write this, let's say my heart rate is about 70 beats per minute. I feel pretty calm, and so it's not too fast. So the beats cancel as we said, and I'm left with 70 milliliters times 70 per minute. So that's about 4, milliliters per minute.

Or if I was to simplify, that's a 5, let's say about. So the flow is about 5 liters per minute. So I figured out the blood flow, and that was simply because I happen to know my weight, and my weight tells me the stroke volume. And I know that there's a change in pressure. We've got to figure that out soon.

And lastly, this last thing over here is resistance. And know I've said it before. I just want to point out to you again, the resistance is going to be proportional to 1 over R to the fourth.

And so just remember that this is an important issue. And that's the radius of the vessel. So let's figure out this equation. Let's figure out the variables in this equation and how it's going to help us solve the question I asked you-- what is the total body resistance? So if I have to figure out total body resistance-- let me clear out the board-- I've got, let's say, the heart.

I like to do the heart in red. And it's pumping blood at my aorta.

Blood pressure, blood flow, and resistance

So blood is going out of the aorta. And then it's going and branching here. And then it's going to branch some more. And you can see where this is going. It's going to keep branching. And eventually every branch kind of collects on the venous side. All the blood is kind of filtering back in slowly into venules and veins. And finally into a vena cava. And I should really draw this going like that. The blood is going to go back into the vena cava.

So that's my system. And I got to figure out what the total body resistance is here. The frequency of the cardiac cycle is described by the heart rate [ 36 ]. There are two phases of the cardiac cycle. The heart ventricles are relaxed and the heart fills with blood in diastole phase [ 37 ].

The ventricles contract and pump blood to the arteries in systole phase [ 38 ]. When the heart fills with blood and the blood is pumped out of the heart one cardiac cycle gets complete.

pressure flow and resistance relationship help

The events of the cardiac cycle explains how the blood enters the heart, is pumped to the lungs, again travels back to the heart and is pumped out to the rest of the body [ 39 ]. The important thing to be observed is that the events that occur in the first and second diastole and systole phases actually happen at the same time [ 40 ].

During this first diastole phase, the atrioventricular valves are open and the atria and ventricles are relaxed. From the superior and inferior vena cavae the de-oxygenated blood flows in to the right atrium.

The atrioventricular valves which are opened allow the blood to pass through to the ventricles [ 41 ]. The Sino Atrial SA node contracts and also triggers the atria to contract.

pressure flow and resistance relationship help

The contents of the right atrium get emptied into the right ventricle. During this first systole phase, the right ventricle contracts as it receives impulses from the Purkinje fibers [ 42 ]. The semi lunar valves get opened and the atrioventricular valves get closed. The de-oxygenated blood is pumped into the pulmonary artery. The back flow of blood in to the right ventricle is prevented by pulmonary valve [ 43 ].

The blood is carried by pulmonary artery to the lungs. There the blood picks up the oxygen and is returned to the left atrium of the heart by the pulmonary veins [ 44 ]. In the next diastolic phase, the atrioventricular valves get opened and the semi lunar valves get closed. The left atrium gets filled by blood from the pulmonary veins, simultaneously Blood from the vena cava is also filling the right atrium. The Sino Atrial SA node contracts again triggering the atria to contract.

The contents from the left atrium were into the left ventricle [ 45 ]. During the following systolic phase, the semi lunar valves get open and atrioventricular valves get closed. The left ventricle contracts, as it receives impulses from the Purkinje fibers [ 47 ].

Oxygenated blood is pumped into the aorta. The prevention of oxygenated blood from flowing back into the left ventricle is done by the aortic valve. Aortic and mitral valves are important as they are highly important for the normal function of heart [ 48 ].

The aorta branches out and provides oxygenated blood to all parts of the body. The oxygen depleted blood is returned to the heart via the vena cavae. Left Ventricular pressure or volume overload hypertrophy LVH leads to LV remodeling the first step toward heart failure, causing impairment of both diastolic and systolic function [ 4950 ]. Coronary heart disease [CHD] is a global health problem that affects all ethnic groups involving various risk factors [ 5152 ].

Vasodilation Vasodilation is increase in the internal diameter of blood vessels or widening of blood vessels that is caused by relaxation of smooth muscle cells within the walls of the vessels particularly in the large arteries, smaller arterioles and large veins thus causing an increase in blood flow [ 53 ].

When blood vessels dilate, the blood flow is increased due to a decrease in vascular resistance [ 54 ]. Therefore, dilation of arteries and arterioles leads to an immediate decrease in arterial blood pressure and heart rate hence, chemical arterial dilators are used to treat heart failure, systemic and pulmonary hypertension, and angina [ 55 ].

At times leads to respiratory problems [ 56 ]. The response may be intrinsic due to local processes in the surrounding tissue or extrinsic due to hormones or the nervous system. The frequencies and heart rate were recorded while surgeries [ 57 ]. The process is the opposite of vasodilation. The primary function of Vasodilation is to increase the flow of blood in the body, especially to the tissues where it is required or needed most. This is in response to a need of oxygen, but can occur when the tissue is not receiving enough glucose or lipids or other nutrients [ 61 ].

Hemodynamics (Pressure, Flow, and Resistance)

In order to increase the flow of blood localized tissues utilize multiple ways including release of vasodilators, primarily adenosine, into the local interstitial fluid which diffuses to capillary beds provoking local Vasodilation [ 62 ]. Vasodilation and Arterial Resistance The relationship between mean arterial pressure, cardiac output and total peripheral resistance TPR gets affected by Vasodilation. Vasodilation occurs in the time phase of cardiac systole while vasoconstriction follows in the opposite time phase of cardiac diastole [ 63 ].

Cardiac output blood flow measured in volume per unit time is computed by multiplying the heart rate in beats per minute and the stroke volume the volume of blood ejected during ventricular systole [ 64 ]. TPR depends on certain factors, like the length of the vessel, the viscosity of blood determined by hematocrit and the diameter of the blood vessel.

Vasodilation works to decrease TPR and blood pressure through relaxation of smooth muscle cells in the tunica media layer of large arteries and smaller arterioles [ 6566 ].

A rise in the mean arterial pressure is seen when either of these physiological components cardiac output or TPR gets increased [ 67 ]. Vasodilation occurs in superficial blood vessels of warm-blooded animals when their ambient environment is hot; this diverts the flow of heated blood to the skin of the animal [ 68 ], where heat can be more easily released into the atmosphere [ 69 ].

Vasoconstriction is opposite physiological process. Systemic vascular resistance SVR is the resistance offered by the peripheral circulation [ 72 ], while the resistance offered by the vasculature of the lungs is known as the pulmonary vascular resistance PVR [ 73 ]. Vasodilation increase in diameter decreases SVR, where as Vasoconstriction i. The Units for measuring vascular resistance are dyn.

This is numerically equivalent to hybrid reference units HRUalso known as Wood units, frequently used by pediatric cardiologists. To convert from Wood units to MPa. Calculation of Resistance can be done by using these following formulae: Calculating resistance is that flow is equal to driving pressure divided by resistance.

The systemic vascular resistance can therefore be calculated in units of dyn. The basic tenet of calculating resistance is that flow is equal to driving pressure divided by resistance.

pressure flow and resistance relationship help

Cardiac Output Cardiac output CO is the quantity of blood or volume of blood that is pumped by the heart per minute. Cardiac output is a function of heart rate and stroke volume [ 75 ].

It is the product of stroke volume SV; the volume of blood ejected from the heart in a single beat and heart rate HR; expressed as beats per minute or BPM [ 76 ].

Ivabradine IVB is a novel, specific, heart rate HRlowering agent which is very useful [ 7778 ]. Increasing either heart rate or stroke volume increases cardiac output. Most of the strokes are caused by atrial fibrillation [ 79 ]. The cardiac output for this person at rest is: